Cranleigh Railway Line:
The Guildford and Horsham Direct Railway. ~ 1865 to 1965
Cranleigh Station Totem
 

Signal Post
About Cranleigh Railway Station About Cranleigh Railway Station
Maps of the Cranleigh Railway Line Maps of the Cranleigh Railway Line
Cranleigh Railway Line History Cranleigh Railway Line History
Cranleigh Railway Line Photos - Then & Now Cranleigh Railway Line Photos - Then & Now
Re-Opening the Cranleigh Railway Line Re-Opening the Cranleigh Railway Line
Cranleigh Railway Line Ephemera Cranleigh Railway Line Ephemera
Cranleigh Railway Line Rolling Stock Cranleigh Railway Line Rolling Stock
Articles about the Cranleigh Railway Line Articles about the Cranleigh Railway Line
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LINE HISTORY:
Guildford & Horsham
Plans to Join the two towns
Delays & Problems
HGDR & LBSCR - 'Whose line is it anyway!'
Building the Line
Changes Over the Years
Dr. Beeching and the Closure of the Branch Line
The Railway's Effect on Population
 


Plans to Join the Two Towns

Two different companies initially had plans to join, or at least, "part-join" the two towns by rail. The first was the Horsham and Guildford Direct Railway Company (HGDR), which was formed specifically for the task. The other was the Wey and Arun Junction Canal Company, which wanted to convert 16 miles of its canal between Guildford and Pulborough to railway. The HGDR informed the LBSCR of their plans on 28th July 1859. On 4th August the same year, the Wey and Arun Canal Company informed them of their plans. There is no other mention of the Wey and Arun's plans in the LBSCR Directors' minutes, so it is unclear on when they gave the scheme up .

A bill to incorporate the HGDR was put before Parliament, and on 16th February 1860, LBSCR instructed their solicitor to petition against it. However, by 1st May that year, LBSCR had received a letter from HGDR to inquire if they would be interested in running the line when it was completed. This changed things, and an agreement between the two companies was drawn up on 3rd May 1860, and was finalised on 21st June.

Meanwhile, Parliament had received objections from 31 of the 84 landowners that the railway would pass, but only four of them presented petitions. Most of these may well have been persuaded by the railway company paying higher than normal prices for their land, because during the four day select committee hearing, the only main objector was Lord Grantley, who believed that the view from his property in Wonersh would be ruined, even though the line would be hardly visible being 600 yards away.

The Horsham and Guildford Direct Railway Act was passed on 6th August 1860, with various clauses, including LBSCR being permitted to contribute financially, but not in excess of 75,000, HGDR were permitted to use the 1 miles of LSWR line between Peasmarsh and Guildford and the company had to complete the line within four years (by August 1864) or they would lose their deposit of 12,000 that they had paid for the Act, unless the Board of Trade considered that there was a valid reason for the delay.

Click here to continue to: 'Delays & Problems'